Online Poker Chips Away At Sexual Stereotypes

Women are being increasingly attracted to the excitement of online poker. Many professional women now shop extensively online and it’s natural that they should explore other ways of having fun and spending their money online.According to the UK’s fastest growing poker website, Victor Chandler Poker (http://www.vcpoker.com), it’s no longer just a man’s game. One in six new players joining Victor Chandler Poker is female – up from virtually zero just 2 years ago. The typical female player tends to be between 24 and 25, internet savvy, shops online and has a professional business career.Why women are taking up online pokerThere are 5 main reasons why women are taking up online poker:
Poker is gaining a lot of media attention. TV games shows, high-profile tournaments and the traditional portrayal of poker in film and TV gives the game a glamorous, exciting image.

More and more women are playing the game professionally. The success of women players listed on the Women’s Poker Hall of Fame has created some powerful role models.

The web creates a safe environment. Logging on to a poker website is nowhere near as intimidating as walking into a male-dominated casino. Good online poker rooms are moderated, mostly by women.

Online poker caters for the novice player in a way that was not possible before the web. First, the anonymity means no-one has to worry about looking stupid. Second, there are extensive tips, articles and tutorials online that rapidly educate the novice player.

Games can be played just for fun or for small stakes. One fear is getting into a game where the stakes are continually rising. But fixed cost games mean that if women want to bet, they know exactly how much they stand to win or lose.

Anecdotal evidence from the gambling industry suggests that traditional female traits such as assessing difficult situations, taking in information from multiple sources, make women ideal poker players.But do women really make good poker players?Research from Cambridge Professor, Simon Baron-Cohen in his book “The Essential Difference” suggests that men and women do show different personality traits. These traits undoubtedly influence how both men and women play poker.Professor Baron-Cohen identified three brain types – the female brain, the male brain and the balanced brain:
In the female brain called the E-type, empathizing is the dominant characteristic

In the male brain called the S-type, systemizing is the dominant characteristic

In the balanced brain called the B-type, both characteristics are finely balanced.

According to Professor Baron-Cohen the female/male difference is not absolute but on average, more women have E-type brains and more men have S-type brains. His conclusions:
Women tend to be better at decoding non-verbal communication, picking up subtle nuances and judging a person’s character. Even online, players exhibit certain ‘poker tells’ that can indicate the strength of their hands.

Introduced to new situations, women will stand and watch while men rush in, trying to be the centre of attention. The ability to observe and assess other players before joining in brings an advantage

Males show more direct aggression while women tend to show indirect aggression.

Women are becoming more aggressiveAnd if that was not enough to intimidate the male poker player, research from Purdue University suggests that they will face even stiffer competition from women in the future.Social psychology Professor Amanda Dickman surveyed over 800 adults on the personality characteristics of men and women and found that women are increasingly exhibiting personality traits typically associated with males.According to Dickman, “Women are perceived as having become much more assertive, independent, and competitive over the years.”The future of women’s poker onlineResearch shows that women do indeed have certain personality traits that predispose them to be good poker players. Add to this a layer of aggression and experience and it seems inevitable that potent and successful women poker players will emerge.Online poker websites have already noted a significant growth in women players. The market savvy among them will be quick to see the opportunity and provide facilities and tournaments to encourage more women to play.

Match Colors and Shapes With Qwirkle Board Game

If you and your family are bored with the usual weekend activity, it is time to give your family a different experience with Qwirkle board game. This board game can be enjoyed by both kids and adults that’s why it is perfect for the whole family. Kids as young as 6 years old can play the game since it is easy to learn. It also provides adequate training for the kids when it comes to sequencing, pattern building, and pattern recognition. This board game also develops the logic and strategic skills of the players. If you have already played Set and Scrabble, you will definitely find Qwirkle an easy game to play.Qwirkle board game has wooden blocks with six different shapes and colors that will be used to create rows and columns with common attribute such as color and shape. The rule of the game is very simple: you just have to match different colors and shapes that’s why kids will surely enjoy Qwirkle. But you can also control the complexity of the game to give more challenge to the adults if they compose most of the players. The basic rule of the game may be simple but you need to have proper and well-planned strategy to outperform the other players. Players are given 6 tiles to play and at the end of each turn, the player should still have 6 tiles. This means that if you have placed 2 tiles, you should get another 2 tiles from the bag. If you have successfully placed a tile, you will get one point for that but if you have successfully placed all the six tiles, you will get 6 points. Laying 6 tiles is called Qwirkle.The good thing about this board game is that you don’t have to have outside knowledge to play the game. You just have to match colors and shapes and you will surely get some points. This board game is also best suited for the kids since it will only last for 45 minutes which is not that long or short. Aside from this, Qwirkle is very portable so you can bring it whenever you have out-of-town trips or outdoor activities. With the 108 colored wooden tiles, you and your family and friends will surely get the excitement and challenge that you want. Qwirkle board game has won many awards and became the bestselling game during the holiday season.

Horse Fun and Games – The Making of a Card Game

For those of us who love everything equine, horses and games make a great entertainment combination. Creating a horse-themed card game is hard work and requires a lot of careful consideration. This article talks about the early days of discovery for the developers at Funleague Games as they embarked upon the journey of designing their very first card game called “Perfect Stride: Cross-Country!” Naturally, as with many things, the game started out as an idea. We wanted to create a fun horse game that was fanciful and stylized, yet still stayed somewhat true to the experience of riding a horse. Representing the idea of racing at high speed across country on horseback through a card game presented its share of challenges. We experimented with a lot of ideas and several times we experienced moments of “aha! This is it!” and away we’d go full-steam…only to discover a problem. The gameplay logistics were the main sticking points. We were cutting some new ground with this card game; it wasn’t closely based on any other specific game so we didn’t have a tried-and-true template to work from. Rather, we referenced bits and pieces of gameplay elements from other games we’d played and from our own vision of how we thought things should work considering the experience we were trying to emulate. Two other resources that have definitely been invaluable are Board Game Geek and Board Game Designer’s Forum. Thanks to everyone there who has posted such excellent info! Here are some examples of things we had a tough time figuring out: Our card game is essentially a race across country on horseback. You jump obstacles along the way…how do you represent that? Do you use tiles? Do you lay the cards out all at once, or one at a time? Face-up? Face-down? That kind of thing. Another element we struggled with was how the rider order was represented during the course of the race.If you were in first, but then dropped back to third, how would you know? We tried a bunch of things such as using charts, placing a token amongst the jump cards, etc. After a lot of trial and error, we eventually figured out a system that wasn’t confusing (unlike our earlier versions). We also struggled with trying to inject some strategy into the gameplay. We definitely didn’t want this game to be all about “luck of the draw”. We wanted the players to have to evaluate each situation and choose a best course of action. Strategy does add depth to a game, but on the flip side of this, a bit of chance can really spice things up and keep you wondering as you draw that next card. As this was a racing game, we didn’t want the players to get too bogged down pondering their options. That would detract from the idea that you were all moving at high speed over terrain in a dash for the finish line. Those were just some of the many things we needed to figure out as we developed our initial idea into something fun, functional and richly thematic. After emerging from the idea phase, we entered a stage of development where we needed to examine more practical business considerations: How big should the deck be?That has proven to depend upon a few things such as number of players, how many variables we were prepared to deal with, printing costs and art costs. We wanted the deck to have substance, yet still maintain some kind of control on the budget.
What should we price the game at?Now that one is ongoing. Naturally we need to make some sort of profit as a reward for our hard efforts and the main way to estimate what kind of pricing is involved is by breaking down the “per-unit costs”. For example, we make an initial assumption that the first print run might be about 5000 copies. Therefore, we would get a printing quote for 5000 copies of the game. And then add to that the cost for artwork creation. And legal fees. And advertising. That sort of thing. Add all those costs together, and divide by 5000. That will be our per-unit cost.How should we package and present the game?We need to look at a couple of key things here. One is; what kind of presentation will be most appealing to people? We want the theme to be immediately recognizable and we want to convey the message that this is a quality game. A game where it’s a high-calibre entertainment experience made of durable materials that will be a pleasure to handle. The other consideration is how much will the packaging and materials cost? Printing/manufacturing costs are arguably THE most expensive part of creating a board or card game. And the quotes will vary widely with each print shop we approach.Legal stuff?A board or card game is a creative product. It’s art and entertainment, meets commerce. There’s intellectual property, copyright, trademarks and other basic business considerations. We recognize that it’s a good idea to protect our hard work and ensure that all communication is organized and in writing. Legal stuff is not only about protecting what’s ours; it’s also about being clear about obligations when engaging in business with another party. When it comes to hiring artists to create artwork for a game, copyright ownership is one of the biggest key factors. It’s important to ensure clarity about who owns the art. Paying an artist to create artwork doesn’t necessarily mean we actually own it. It’s essential to have an “Artist Agreement” in place. This is a legal document that details the rights and obligations between Funleague Games and the artist. Artists work hard to do what they do best (we know this firsthand…Jeff and I are both professional artists) and naturally will want to be clear about all the details involving the work they do.What kind of art style am I looking for?This is an important thing to figure out, but it can be a tough one. The style of art is heavily influenced by the style of the hired artist(s) working on your project. It’s important to choose carefully who will be creating the visuals for the game. Arguably good art will sell more copies of a bad game than bad art on a good game. People like things to look “cool” or “beautiful”. Make sure you deliver in spades in this area by having a strong vision for what your game should look like and by only hiring artists who have an art style compatible with that vision. Art style should also take into consideration the target market your game is aimed at. In the case of Perfect Stride: Cross-Country!, I’m going for a style that is distinct from other games on the market. I also want the style to be inclusive and appealing to the full range of my target audience. For example, I need to avoid an art style that is too “young” as my target audience are people ages 7 and up. I want to feature artwork that has a fun innocence to it, but at the same time possesses enough refinement to appeal to a more mature audience.Who’s our audience?This is important right out of the gate (now there’s a theme-appropriate expression :) . Even at the earliest design phase it’s important to know our demographic. For example, if we designed a game to include a lot of deep and subtle complexities or tons of arithmetic, chances are that kids under 7 years of age could find the game too difficult. As for Perfect Stride: Cross-Country!, I feel that this will be a game that can be enjoyed by almost everybody, but the primary audience will likely be people who love horses. And as there is an element of strategy to the game, the very young may struggle with some of the gameplay concepts.Marketing?This is SOOOOoooo important. If Jeff and I never bother to get the word out about our really cool game, how are we going to sell it? Entire books (and even university degrees) are devoted to the topic of marketing, but suffice it to say it’s important that we learn a little bit about how to promote our product. Not only will we not sell any (or very few) copies, but so many people will never get the chance to enjoy a super-fun horse-themed experience! As our game is very strongly based on a specific theme (or niche) one of the first things we’ll do is seek to get the word out at places where the horse-loving public like to visit such as horse-themed websites, tack shops, equestrian magazines, etc.As you can see, we have our work cut out for us, but the creation of this card game has been a wonderful journey so far. We look forward to the time when the game is complete and ready to be enjoyed by many!


www.metayl.cf www.tpscheb.cf www.kubita.gq www.psymap.gq www.bpvz.cf www.kzadmin.cf www.pizamka.ga www.tdsmart.ga www.sayter.cf www.detivl.ga www.tnkl.ga www.pizamka.cf www.ebudka.ga www.dnesska.ga www.ipknus.cf www.hostlib.cf www.dlolimp.cf www.glomaro.cf www.liftok.gq www.lcibe.ga www.klyuz.cf www.theants.gq www.liftok.cf www.kvaskb.cf www.snochgu.cf www.culty.cf www.hihiha.cf www.leolr.gq www.lcecacw.gq www.mynwave.ga www.mirlied.cf www.mballod.cf www.lihoss.cf www.kriavto.cf www.gaswild.ga www.ocnaswc.gq www.arzweb.ga www.ltender.gq www.oilbord.cf www.belal.ga www.ihayat.cf www.clipone.ga www.elekot.ga www.gromani.gq www.ickazan.cf www.esbrain.gq www.gsoramo.ga www.biniku.cf www.gorgyys.ga www.norvard.ga www.oknahm.ga www.oaopik.cf www.newkal.gq www.nilsoil.cf www.rinebun.ga www.pprsama.cf www.pposhta.cf www.ofcpb.cf www.possnet.cf www.juiendo.ga www.jdtam.cf www.newroud.cf www.postrem.cf www.mylofk.cf www.obena.ga www.nabford.cf www.jobcpa.cf www.jobpays.cf www.jrgruop.ga www.knonde.cf www.jotina.ga www.faresi.gq www.ivdns.gq www.esifar.ga www.igrotei.cf www.inverzu.cf www.joqwt.cf krtx.info www.gpresh.ga www.gnewgt.gq www.gedafoss.cf www.maybey.gq www.adbikes.gq www.tuuci.ga www.wroof.cf www.usaname.cf jztx.info 966989.info www.mcnab.cf